June

With the grasses growing taller, ox-eye daisy, hawkbit, hawkweed and ragwort began to appear. The sunny days brought out a mass of new wild flowers: scarlet pimpernel, bird's-foot trefoil, bedstraws, poppies, St John's-wort, hedge woundwort, self-heal, white clover and broad-leaved willowherb in the fruit cage.  Ivy and convolvulus, also known as bindweed, began to spread everywhere. 

Up to fifty white helleborine orchids were found across the garden, many in new locations.  These were followed by spotted orchids, then the pyramidals and finally the bee orchids.  The carpet of spotted orchids under the copper beech tree didn't happen this year, possibly due to the tree casting too much shadow. However we did get six bees. Sadly the belgarum variant that appeared a few years ago has not returned.

Self-heal, also known as heart-of-the-earth, brownwort, blue curls and carpenter's herb, is edible with its leaves added to a salad or the whole plant boiled and eaten as a potherb. Due to its flowers opening only when the sun shines, scarlet pimpernel has acquired names such as shepherd's weather glass, poorman's barometer and shepherd's clock. 

In the past lady's bedstraw was dried and used to stuff mattresses as their scent acts as a flea repellant.  Hedge bedstraw is also quaintly known as false baby's breath!

St John's-wort

Hedge bedstraw

Spotted orchid

Hawkbit

Lady's or yellow bedstraw

Pyramidal orchid

Hawkweed

Self-heal 

Bee orchid

White clover

Woundwort

Ivy

Bird's-foot trefoil

Convolvulus

Scarlet pimpernel

also Eggs and bacon

also Field bindweed

Poppy

Ragwort

Ox-eye or Dog daisy

Broad-leaved willow-herb

Ox-eye daisies

End of June